STUDY RESULTS:

 

2016 Migration Study


Question: Does transport of Sockeye  through the Whooshh fish transport system measurably affect their upstream migration? 


Study Plan: PDF


Conclusion: No and Yes. There were no findings of significance affecting migration, homing, or survival. However, the sockeye that passed over the top of the dam  through the Whooshh system migrated faster to the next two dams, 91 and 124 river kilometers upstream, respectively. These findings were statistically significant compared to the comparator Sockeye group which completed the Priest Rapids passage via the ladder .


Lab: CRITFC


Contact: Jeff Fryer


Species: Sockeye


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV


2016 Aquaculture Fish Welfare Study


Question: Does the Whooshh Fish Transport System (WFTS)  provide for better fish welfare (less stress on the fish) as compared to aqua pumps or hand carriage handling?


Study Plan: PDF


Conclusion: The WFTS itself does not impose stress, behavior or other welfare concerns on the fish. Attention must be paid to other transfer processes to minimize stress pre-Whooshh transport.


Lab: SINTEF


Contact: Ulf Erikson


Species: Atlantic salmon


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV

2016 High Head Dam Transport Simulation


Question: Does fish transport through an 1100' long and nearly 100' high Whooshh Fish Transport System affect adult survival, reproduction or egg viability outcomes?


Study Plan: PDF


Conclusion: TBD. Sutdy on-going. Fifty-eight Chinook were transported through the long tube. Passage time was on average ~35 seconds. No mortalities immediately post-WFTS transport reported.


Lab: Yakama Nation Fisheries


Contact: Dave Fast & Mark Johnston


Species: Chinook


Study Results: Not Yet Published - Test Period June - February


Video: MOV

2015 Transport Viability Study


Question: Do live adult Atlantic salmon safely travel through the Whooshh system when oriented to enter either head first or trail first?


Conclusion: Yes. The Whooshh system successfully transported all fish whether facing forward or backward. There was no statistical difference between fish transported in the Whooshh system related to fish entry orientation.


Lab: Conservation Fund Fresh Water Institute


Contact: Steve Summerfelt


Species: Atlantic Salmon


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV


2015 G Force Study


Question: Will fish experience any extraordinary, potentially harmful, G forces when travelling through the Whooshh fish transport system?


Conclusion: No. The instantaneous G forces experienced by fish going through the Whooshh system are overall quite low.  They are less than half the G force a fish experiences when falling back into the water either onto its belly or backwards from a 36 inches height, which is a scenario typically experienced when fish are discharged from a truck in a trap and haul operation or down and out a fish slide where the fish do not re-enter the water head first.


Lab: PNNL


Contact:  Zhiqun Deng


Species: N/A - Electronic Sensor


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV


Other reference study 1: PDF


Other reference study 2PDF

2015 Sturgeon Transit Study


Question:  Will Lake Sturgeon safely transport through the Whooshh fish transport system?


Conclusion: Yes. There was no indication of external injury to study fish caused by passage through the Whooshh Fish Transport System. No mortalities occurred in the study: Whooshh and control transport groups. These results support the potential of the Whooshh system as a viable method for sturgeon passage upstream or downstream at dams.


Lab: Alden Research Laboratory Inc.


Contact: Steve Amaral


Species: Lake Sturgeon


Study Abstract: PDF


Video: Not Yet Available


Study: PDF: Presented at Fish Passage 2016 International Conference on River Connectivity

 

2015 Volitional Entry Study


Question: Can Whooshh demonstrate volitional entry and effective transport of pink salmon through the Whooshh fish transport system?


Conclusion: Yes.  500 pink salmon, on their own volition, swam into the Whooshh fish transport system position downstream of Buckley dam on the White River and were safely transported to a tank on a transport truck.


Lab: Puyallup and Muckleshoot Indian Tribes


Contact: Justin Paul


Species: Pink salmon


Study Report: PDF


Videos: 1. MOV    2. MOV

2014  Reproductive Readiness Study


Question: Is reproductive readiness of adult fall Chinook salmon affected by transport travel through a 40' or a 250' Whooshh fish transport system as compared to transport travel via a trap and haul or control-net handled?


Conclusion:  No. There was no indication that transport method had any effect on reproductive readiness.  Female fish plasma vitellogenin concentrations for the female fish that were transported through the Whooshh system or via trap and haul were similar to the control group.


Lab: PNNL


Contact: Alison Colotelo/David Geist


Species: Fall Chinook


Study Results: PDF 


Video: MOV


Additional Study Info: 1. PDF     2. MOV

2014  Broodstock Survival Study


Question:  Is the survival rate of hand carried Chinook broodstock comparable to the survival rate of Whooshh transported Chinook broodstock at Roza dam on the Yakima River?


Conclusion: Yes, in fact in this 2014 study the survival rate of Whooshh transported Chinook broodstock was better than that of the hand carried Chinook broodstock.  Although the total number of fish transferred was small, the Whooshh fish mortality rate was approximately one-half that of the hand carry transport method. 


Lab: Yakama Nation -  Cle Elum Hatchery


Contact: David Fast


Species: Spring Chinook


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV


Additional Study DataPDF

2014 Survival Study


Question: Does transport method affect adult salmon survival: comparative study evaluating fall Chinook salmon travelling through a 40' or 250' Whooshh Fish Transport System, trap and haul transport and control fish?


Conclusion:  No, transport methods evaluated had no impact on adult salmon survival. No significant differences in survival rates were detected between the transport study groups.


Lab: PNNL


Contact: Alison Colotelo/David Geist


Species: Fall Chinook


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV


Additional Study Info: 1. PDF     2. MOV

2014-2015 Yr 2 Spring Chinook Adult Passage Viability Study


Question: Are the spring Chinook adult survival, productive spawning and egg viability data of Whooshh transported verses hand and haul transport reproducible?


Conclusion: Yes. Although 2015 was an exceptionally hot year, the comparative results between Whooshh transport and hand and haul of 2014 were reproduced in 2015.


Lab: Yakima Nation Fisheries


Contact:  Mark Johnston


Species: Spring Chinook


Study Report: PDF


2014  Epithelial Injury Study


Question: Do fall Chinook salmon travelling through a 40' or a 250' Whooshh fish transport system incur epithelial injury?


Conclusion: No. Fish passing through the Whooshh tube incur no epithelial damage as indices of epithelial injury suggest that no differences could be distinguished between Whooshh transported, trap and haul transported and control-net handled fish.


Lab: PNNL


Contact: Alison Colotelo/David Geist


Species: Fall Chinook


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV


Additional Study InfoPDF      MOV


Slides: PDF

 

2014 Gamete Survival Study


Question: Is gamete survival of fall Chinook salmon affected by adult transport through a 40' or a 250' Whooshh fish transport system prior to spawning relative to trap and haul transported and control-net handled fish?


Conclusion: No. Survival of gametes to the eyed egg stage, an indicator of whether survival of offspring is successful or compromised, was not significantly different among the four study groups.


Lab: PNNL


Contact: Alison Colotelo/David Geist


Species: Fall Chinook


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV


Additional Study Info: 1. PDF      2. MOV

2014  Eyed Egg Viability Study


Question: Is the percentage of viable eggs collected and fertilized from a group of Chinook transported by the Whooshh system equivalent to the percentage of viable eggs collected and fertilized from a group of hand-carried Chinook?


Conclusion: Yes. Egg viability percentages were very high and were statistically equivalent between the groups of fish transported by the hand-carry and the Whooshh system methods.


Lab: Yakama Nation -  Cle Elum Hatchery


Contact: David Fast


Species: Spring Chinook


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV


Additional Study DataPDF


2014 Physiological Stress Study


Question: Do fall Chinook salmon travelling through a 40' or a 250' Whooshh fish transport system incur additional physiological stress compared to the trap and haul transport or control-net transport fish?


Conclusion:  No. There was no significant difference in elevated immune response levels among the study groups measured 2-3 days post-transport. Additionally, there was no indication of a difference in female cortisol levels, as an indicator of stress, attributable to the Whooshh Fish Transport System experience.


Lab: PNNL


Contact: Alison Colotelo/David Geist


Species: Fall Chinook


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV


Additional Study Info: 1. PDF      2. MOV

2014  Voluntary Entry Study


Question: What is the feasibility of having salmon voluntarily enter the Whooshh system without the assistance of human handling?


Conclusion: Yes, it is feasible, adult salmon ascended a steep pass and descended down a flume. They entered into a V notch head first and then glided into the Whooshh tube entry and passed safely and successfully through the WFTS into the holding tank.


Lab: Yakama Nation -  Cle Elum Hatchery


Contact: David Fast


Species: Spring Chinook


Study Results: PDF


Video: MOV

2011  Physiological Response Study


Question: How do the physiological responses compare between groups of hatchery adult rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after traveling through an early prototype of the Whooshh Fish Transport System (WFTS) or by trap and haul transport?


Conclusion: The results indicated that fish that were passed through the Whooshh Fish Transport System were not severely stressed or injured from the Whooshh tube experience when compared to trout that were transported by trap and haul. 


Lab: USGS Columbia River Research Laboratory


Contact: Matt Mesa/ Steve Waste


Species: Rainbow Trout


Published Study Results: PDF