WHOOSHH

Here's our proof.

Here is the collection of all the studies done using Whooshh, so you can see our impact for yourself.

 

2011
2014
2015
2016
2017
2011
2011  Physiological Response Study

QuestionHow do the physiological responses compare between groups of hatchery adult rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss after traveling through an early prototype of the Whooshh Fish Transport System (WFTS) or by trap and haul transport?


Conclusion:  The results indicated that fish that were passed through the Whooshh Fish Transport System were not severely stressed or injured from the Whooshh tube experience when compared to trout that were transported by trap and haul. 


Lab: USGS Columbia River Research Laboratory 

Contact: Matt Mesa & Steve Waste

Species: Rainbow Trout

Published Study Results: PDF


2014
2014 WDFW Hatchery Steelhead Transport Demonstration Study

Question:  Is it possible to safely transport hatchery steelhead 250 ft through the Whooshh fish transport system?


Conclusion: Yes.  Hatchery steelhead were transported ~250 ft in an average of ~13 seconds.  All steelhead exiting the tube immediately swam away in a direction of their own choosing.


Study Report: PDF (Kalama Falls doc)

Lab: Kalama Falls Hatchery

Contact: WDFW

Species: Hatchery Steelhead


2014  Epithelial Injury Study

QuestionDo fall Chinook salmon travelling through a 40' or a 250' Whooshh fish transport system incur epithelial injury?


ConclusionNo. Fish passing through the Whooshh tube incur no epithelial damage as indices of epithelial injury suggest that no differences could be distinguished between Whooshh transported, trap and haul transported and control-net handled fish.


LabPNNL

ContactAlison Colotelo/David Geist

SpeciesFall Chinook

Study ResultsPDF

Additional Study InfoPDF   

SlidesPDF


2014 Eyed Egg Viability Study

QuestionIs the percentage of viable eggs collected and fertilized from a group of Chinook transported by the Whooshh system equivalent to the percentage of viable eggs collected and fertilized from a group of hand-carried Chinook?


ConclusionYes. Egg viability percentages were very high and were statistically equivalent between the groups of fish transported by the hand-carry and the Whooshh system methods.


LabYakama Nation -  Cle Elum Hatchery

ContactDavid Fast

SpeciesSpring Chinook

Study Results: PDF

Additional Study DataPDF


2014 Broodstock Survival Study

Question Is the survival rate of hand carried Chinook broodstock comparable to the survival rate of Whooshh transported Chinook broodstock at Roza dam on the Yakima River?


ConclusionYes, in fact in this 2014 study the survival rate of Whooshh transported Chinook broodstock was better than that of the hand carried Chinook broodstock.  Although the total number of fish transferred was small, the Whooshh fish mortality rate was approximately one-half that of the hand carry transport method. 


LabYakama Nation -  Cle Elum Hatchery

ContactDavid Fast

SpeciesSpring Chinook

Study Results: PDF

Additional Study DataPDF


2014 Survival Study

QuestionDoes transport method affect adult salmon survival: comparative study evaluating fall Chinook salmon travelling through a 40' or 250' Whooshh Fish Transport System, trap and haul transport and control fish?


Conclusion:  No, transport methods evaluated had no impact on adult salmon survival. No significant differences in survival rates were detected between the transport study groups.


LabPNNL

ContactAlison Colotelo/David Geist

SpeciesFall Chinook

Study Results: PDF

Additional Study Info: PDF     


2014  Voluntary Entry Study

QuestionWhat is the feasibility of having salmon voluntarily enter the Whooshh system without the assistance of human handling?


Conclusion: Yes, it is feasible, adult salmon ascended a steep pass and descended down a flume. They entered into a V notch head first and then glided into the Whooshh tube entry and passed safely and successfully through the WFTS into the holding tank.


LabYakama Nation -  Cle Elum Hatchery

Contact: David Fast

SpeciesSpring Chinook

Study Results: PDF


2014 Physiological Stress Study

QuestionDo fall Chinook salmon travelling through a 40' or a 250' Whooshh fish transport system incur additional physiological stress compared to the trap and haul transport or control-net transport fish?


Conclusion No. There was no significant difference in elevated immune response levels among the study groups measured 2-3 days post-transport. Additionally, there was no indication of a difference in female cortisol levels, as an indicator of stress, attributable to the Whooshh Fish Transport System experience.


LabPNNL

ContactAlison Colotelo/David Geist

SpeciesFall Chinook

Study Results: PDF

Additional Study InfoPDF   


2014 Gamete Survival Study

QuestionIs gamete survival of fall Chinook salmon affected by adult transport through a 40' or a 250' Whooshh fish transport system prior to spawning relative to trap and haul transported and control-net handled fish?


ConclusionNo. Survival of gametes to the eyed egg stage, an indicator of whether survival of offspring is successful or compromised, was not significantly different among the four study groups.


LabPNNL

ContactAlison Colotelo/David Geist

SpeciesFall Chinook

Study Results: PDF

Additional Study Info PDF    


2014  Reproductive Readiness Study

QuestionIs reproductive readiness of adult fall Chinook salmon affected by transport travel through a 40' or a 250' Whooshh fish transport system as compared to transport travel via a trap and haul or control-net handled?


Conclusion No. There was no indication that transport method had any effect on reproductive readiness.  Female fish plasma vitellogenin concentrations for the female fish that were transported through the Whooshh system or via trap and haul were similar to the control group.


LabPNNL

Contact: Alison Colotelo/David Geist

SpeciesFall Chinook

Study Results: PDF 

Additional Study Info: PDF  


2015
2015 G Force Study

Question: Will fish experience any extraordinary, potentially harmful, G forces when travelling through the Whooshh fish transport system?


ConclusionNo. The instantaneous G forces experienced by fish going through the Whooshh system are overall quite low.  They are less than half the G force a fish experiences when falling back into the water either onto its belly or backwards from a 36 inches height, which is a scenario typically experienced when fish are discharged from a truck in a trap and haul operation or down and out a fish slide where the fish do not re-enter the water head first.


LabPNNL

Contact:  Zhiqun Deng

SpeciesN/A - Electronic Sensor

Study Results: PDF     

VideoMOV

Other reference study 1PDF

Other reference study 2PDF


2014-2015 Year 2 Spring Chinook Adult Passage Viability Study

Question: Are the spring Chinook adult survival, productive spawning and egg viability data of Whooshh transported verses hand and haul transport reproducible?


ConclusionYes. Although 2015 was an exceptionally hot year, the comparative results between Whooshh transport and hand and haul of 2014 were reproduced in 2015.


LabYakima Nation Fisheries

Contact:  Mark Johnston

SpeciesSpring Chinook

Study ReportPDF


2015 Volitional Entry Study

Question: Can Whooshh demonstrate volitional entry and effective transport of pink salmon through the Whooshh fish transport system?


Conclusion: Yes.  500 pink salmon, on their own volition, swam into the Whooshh fish transport system position downstream of Buckley dam on the White River and were safely transported to a tank on a transport truck.


LabPuyallup and Muckleshoot Indian Tribes

ContactJustin Paul

SpeciesPink salmon

Study ReportPDF

Videos:  

1.  MOV  

2.   MOV


2015 Transport Viability Study

Question: Do live adult Atlantic salmon safely travel through the Whooshh system when oriented to enter either head first or trail first?


Conclusion: Yes. The Whooshh system successfully transported all fish whether facing forward or backward. There was no statistical difference between fish transported in the Whooshh system related to fish entry orientation.


Lab: Conservation Fund Fresh Water Institute

Contact: Steve Summerfelt

Species: Atlantic Salmon

Study Results: PDF 

Video: MOV 


2015 Sturgeon Transit Study

Question Will Lake Sturgeon safely transport through the Whooshh fish transport system?


ConclusionYes. There was no indication of external injury to study fish caused by passage through the Whooshh Fish Transport System. No mortalities occurred in the study: Whooshh and control transport groups. These results support the potential of the Whooshh system as a viable method for sturgeon passage upstream or downstream at dams.


Lab: Alden Research Laboratory Inc.

Contact: Steve Amaral

SpeciesLake Sturgeon

Study Abstract: PDF

Video: Not Yet Available

StudyPDF: Presented at Fish Passage 2016 International Conference on River Connectivity


2016
2016 Whooshh Passage

Question: Is it feasible to safely, efficiently and effectively transport salmon 1,100 ft distance with a 100 ft elevation via the Whooshh Fish Transport System?


Conclusion: Yes. In the summer of 2016 58 late spring summer Chinook were transported via WFTS 1,100 ft with a100 ft elevation in ~35 seconds with controlled deceleration into a hatchery truck.  The fish were hauled to Cle Elum hatchery and observed for adult survival until ripe for harvest (1-3 months )and egg viability. Comparisons of adult survival and egg viability were drawn between the 1,100 ft WFTS Chinook and ~85 ft hand carriage or 40 ft Chinook groups.  No difference in adult survival or egg viability was observed between the groups. 


Study ReportPDF  (Roza Yr 3 document)

Lab: Yakama Nation

Contact: Dave Fast, Mark Johnson, Bill Bosch

Species: SpringChinook

Videos: USBR MOV

  Whooshh MOV

3 Year Study Comparison including 1 Year High Head Dam Transport Simulation

Question: Does fish transport through either a 40' or an 1100' long and nearly 100' high Whooshh Fish Transport System significantly affect adult survival, reproduction or egg viability outcomes?


Conclusion: No. There was no significant difference in survival of Chinook salmon held up to four months after travelling through the Whooshh tube as compared to the control group - a typical trap and haul operation.


Study Plan: PDF

Lab: Yakama Nation Fisheries

Contact: Dave Fast & Mark Johnston

Species: Chinook

Study ResultsPDF

Video: MOV

2016 Migration Study

QuestionDoes transport of Sockeye  through the Whooshh fish transport system measurably affect their upstream migration? 


ConclusionNo and Yes. There were no findings of significance affecting migration, homing, or survival. However, the sockeye that passed over the top of the dam  through the Whooshh system 


Study PlanPDF

LabCRITFC

Contact: Jeff Fryer

SpeciesSockeye

Study ResultsPDF

Video: MOV

Additional Study Info: PDF

2016 Post WFTS Transport: Adult Survival and Egg Rates Reproducible Across 3 Years

Question:  Comparing hand carriage vs 40 ft Whooshhtransport followed by hatchery truck haul are the adult survival and eggviability rates comparatively reproducible? An evaluation of three-years worthof data.


Conclusion: Yes. Although the environmental conditions varied considerably across the three years of study (2014, 2015 and 2016), the impact did not affect the comparative adult survival and rates within a given year.There was no statistical difference in adult survival rates between the hand carriage and 40 ft Whooshh tube transport. Egg viability rates were not influenced by environmental conditions and remained very high, >92% across all groups and years. The outcomes support the conclusion that the WFTS is are liable, durable, viable alternative to the standard hand-walking transport method from the fish safety perspective and provides a reduced risk benefit to the fish of damage due to accidental dropping. From the fish handler perspective, the WFTS is easy to use, fast, may reduce potential fish injury, and adds a measure of safety for the fish handler. The results of this comprehensive comparative study strongly endorses the recommendation of WFTS use for safe transport of live fish.


Study Report: PDF  (Roza Yr 3 document)

Lab: Yakama Nation

Contact: Dave Fast,Mark Johnson, Bill Bosch

Species: Spring Chinook


2016 Aquaculture Fish Welfare Study

Question: Does the Whooshh Fish Transport System (WFTS)  provide for better fish welfare (less stress on the fish) as compared to aqua pumps or hand carriage handling?


Study Plan: PDF


Conclusion: The WFTS itself does not impose stress, behavior or other welfare concerns on the fish. Attention must be paid to other transfer processes to minimize stress pre-Whooshh transport.


Lab: SINTEF

ContactUlf Erikson

SpeciesAtlantic salmon

Study ResultsPDF

Video: MOV

2017
2017 Evaluation of Volitional Entry, Sorting and Passage of Adult Pacific Salmonids Through a Novel Fish Passage Technology

QuestionThe sorting by species and passage efficiency of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)  and steelhead (O. mykiss) through the WESS-WFTS was assessed.


Conclusion: PNNL found that the WESS-WFTS was able to sort the fish by size, few fish had external injuries, and few unexpected events (e.g. backward transport, discontinuous transport) occurred. PNNL results support the use of the WESS-WFTS as an effective transport system for adult salmonids when used in conjunction with a volitional fishway entrance.


Lab: PNNL

Contact: Alison Colotelo

Species: Chinook, Steelhead

Research Highlights: A Bene-fish-al Solution for Salmon and Steelhead Passage

Study Report: Evaluation of Volitional Entry and Passage of Adult Pacific Salmonids through a Novel

Fish Passage Technology


2017 Evaluation of Sockeye Salmon after Passage through an Innovative Upstream Fish-Passage System at a high head dam

Question: Can a Whooshh system safely transport sockeye salmon over a 180' x 1700' high head dam in less than a minute.


Conclusion: Yes, statistical equivalence with  a trap and haul control group was achieved within 4 days of operation and optimization using real time adaptive management.


Lab: USGS

Contact: Tobias J. Koch

Species: Sockeye

Study Report: PDF

PP Slides: PDF

2017 American Shad: Transport Feasibility Study

Question: Is it feasible to transport American shad via a Whooshh fish transport system? What is the associated passage survival and impact on the epithelium associated with Whooshh passage? 


Conclusion: Yes, it is feasible to safely, efficiently and effectively transport via Whooshh fish transport system.  Comparing fluorescein dye staining for epithelial injury, it was found that the level of staining was very low indicating very small or limited injury, the patterns being consistent with study-associated fish handling, and no differences were found between the non-transported shad and the WFTS-transported shad.  Immediate survival post-WFTS transport was 100% and 24 hour survival of shad was 97.4% excluding the few shad that were injured due to correctable technical setup complications encountered for the temporary installation


Lab: HDR Engineering, Inc

Contact: Michael Sears

Species: American Shad

Study Report: PDF